The perceived assortativity of social networks: Methodological problems and solutions

@article{Fisher2017ThePA,
  title={The perceived assortativity of social networks: Methodological problems and solutions},
  author={David N. Fisher and Matthew J. Silk and Daniel W. Franks},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2017},
  volume={abs/1701.08671}
}
Networks describe a range of social, biological and technical phenomena. An important property of a network is its degree correlation or assortativity, describing how nodes in the network associate based on their number of connections. Social networks are typically thought to be distinct from other networks in being assortative (possessing positive degree correlations); well-connected individuals associate with other well-connected individuals, and poorly connected individuals associate with… 
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