The peptide toxin amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from moisture-damaged buildings is immunotoxic, induces potassium efflux from mammalian cells, and has antimicrobial activity.

@article{RasimusSahari2015ThePT,
  title={The peptide toxin amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from moisture-damaged buildings is immunotoxic, induces potassium efflux from mammalian cells, and has antimicrobial activity.},
  author={Stiina Rasimus-Sahari and Vera V. Teplova and Maria A. Andersson and Raimo Mikkola and P{\"a}ivi M Kankkunen and Sampsa Matikainen and Carl G Gahmberg and Leif C Andersson and Mirja S. Salkinoja-Salonen},
  journal={Applied and environmental microbiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={81 8},
  pages={2939-49}
}
Amylosin, a heat-stable channel-forming non-ribosomally synthesized peptide toxin produced by strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from moisture-damaged buildings, is shown in this paper to have immunotoxic and cytotoxic effects on human cells as well as antagonistic effects on microbes. Human macrophages exposed to 50 ng of amylosin ml(-1) secreted high levels of cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 within 2 h, indicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an integral part… CONTINUE READING
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