The peoples and cultures of Ethiopia

@article{Lewis1976ThePA,
  title={The peoples and cultures of Ethiopia},
  author={Ioan M. Lewis},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences},
  year={1976},
  volume={194},
  pages={16 - 7}
}
  • I. Lewis
  • Published 27 August 1976
  • History
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
The two main elements in Ethiopia’s uniquely rich ethnic cultural heritage are the Cushitic-speaking peoples, traditionally centred in the lowlands, and the Semitic-speaking peoples of the highlands, who derived from a fusion of local Cushitic stock with South Arabian immigrants in the first millennium B. C. The Tigreans and Amharas who have dominated Ethiopian political history from its foundations at Axum, also provide a sturdy peasantry, living typically in dispersed settlements and… 
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