The origin of human pathogens: evaluating the role of agriculture and domestic animals in the evolution of human disease

@article{PearceDuvet2006TheOO,
  title={The origin of human pathogens: evaluating the role of agriculture and domestic animals in the evolution of human disease},
  author={J. Pearce-Duvet},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2006},
  volume={81}
}
Many significant diseases of human civilization are thought to have arisen concurrently with the advent of agriculture in human society. It has been hypothesised that the food produced by farming increased population sizes to allow the maintenance of virulent pathogens, i.e. civilization pathogens, while domestic animals provided sources of disease to humans. To determine the relationship between pathogens in humans and domestic animals, I examined phylogenetic data for several human pathogens… Expand
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