The origin of contraversive pushing

@article{Karnath2000TheOO,
  title={The origin of contraversive pushing},
  author={Hans-Otto Karnath and Susanne Ferber and J. Dichgans},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={2000},
  volume={55},
  pages={1298 - 1304}
}
Background: Stroke patients may exhibit the peculiar behavior of actively pushing away from the nonhemiparetic side, leading to lateral postural imbalance and a tendency to fall toward the paralyzed side. This phenomenon has been called the “pusher syndrome.” Objective: The current study analyzes the mechanism leading to contraversive pushing. Methods: The subjective postural vertical (SPV) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) were determined in five consecutively admitted patients with severe… Expand
Leg orientation as a clinical sign for pusher syndrome
TLDR
The observation that patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss showed no alterations of leg posture indicates that disturbed Vestibular afferences alone are not responsible for the disordered leg responses seen in pusher patients. Expand
Contraversive Pushing and Inattention of the Contralesional Hemispace
TLDR
The similarity of the presence of contraversive pushing and the syndrome of spatial hemineglect together with a gender-related differentiation suggest the existence of a “pusher syndrome”, in which the pathophysiology points in the direction of a spatial higher-order processing deficit, related to spatial inattention, underlying the higher frequency and severity of contraversion pushing after right brain lesions. Expand
Posture control in Pusher syndrome: influence of lateral semicircular canals.
TLDR
The findings indicate that a dysfunction of semicircular canals does not seem to be relevant for the clinical manifestations of the Pusher syndrome. Expand
Subjective visual vertical (SVV) determined in a representative sample of 15 patients with pusher syndrome
TLDR
The perception of SVV was investigated in a more representative sample consisting of 15 stroke patients with severe pusher syndrome and Contraversive pushing was assessed by using the standardized ‘Scale for Contraversive Pushing’ (SCP). Expand
Understanding and treating "pusher syndrome".
TLDR
A new physical therapy approach is suggested for patients with pusher syndrome where the visual control of vertical upright orientation, which is undisturbed in these patients, is the central element of intervention. Expand
Controle postural na sndrome de Pusher: influncia dos canais semicirculares laterais
TLDR
It is indicated that a dysfunction of semicircular canals does not seem to be relevant for the clinical manifestations of the Pusher syndrome. Expand
Posterior thalamic hemorrhage induces “pusher syndrome”
TLDR
Posterior thalamus seems to be fundamentally involved in the authors' control of upright body posture and higher pressure, swelling, and other secondary pathologic processes associated with posterior thalamic hemorrhage may provoke contraversive pushing in combination with additional neurologic symptoms. Expand
Pusher syndrome: its cortical correlate
TLDR
There was a trend towards an association between lesions of the posterior part of the insula, the operculum and the superior temporal gyrus and the extent of pushing in patients with right-sided lesions and a link between the systems responsible for postural control and for processing vestibular otolith information was pointed toward. Expand
Contraversive pushing in non-stroke patients
TLDR
It is demonstrated that contraversive pushing may also occur in patients with non-stroke neurological lesions and suggest that resolution of symptoms may vary according to the underlying etiology. Expand
Pusher Syndrome – a frequent but little-known disturbance of body orientation perception
  • H. Karnath
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Neurology
  • 2006
TLDR
Stroke patients with “pusher syndrome” suffer from a severe misperception of their body's orientation in the coronal (roll) plane, and appear to have no significant difficulty in determining the orientation of the surrounding visual world in relation to their own body. Expand
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