The origin and evolution of birds

@inproceedings{Feduccia1996TheOA,
  title={The origin and evolution of birds},
  author={Alan Feduccia},
  year={1996}
}
  • A. Feduccia
  • Published 1996
  • Biology, Environmental Science
This text is a comprehensive and illustrated discussion of the origin of birds and of avian flight. Ornithologist and evolutionary biologist Alan Feduccia, author of "Age of Birds," here draws on fossil evidence and studies of the structure and biochemistry of living birds to present knowledge and data on avian evolution and propose a model of this evolutionary process. Feduccia begins with an overview of bird evolution, giving his opinions about the controversial problem in verte-brate… 

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