The origin and early radiation of the therapsid mammal‐like reptiles: a palaeobiological hypothesis

@article{Kemp2006TheOA,
  title={The origin and early radiation of the therapsid mammal‐like reptiles: a palaeobiological hypothesis},
  author={Thomas Kemp},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={19}
}
  • T. Kemp
  • Published 1 July 2006
  • Environmental Science, Geography, Biology
  • Journal of Evolutionary Biology
The replacement of the basal synapsid pelycosaurs by the more 'mammal-like' therapsids in the Permian was an important event in the history of tetrapods because it initiated the eventual transition to the mammals. [] Key Result The subsequent explosive radiation of therapsids was associated with habitat expansion made possible by the Mid-Permian development of geographical continuity between that biome and the temperate biomes. The final extinction of the pelycosaurs was a case of incumbent replacement by…
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This study examines the best record available for the time of the extinction, the tetrapod-bearing formations of Texas, at a finer stratigraphic scale than those previously employed, indicating that Olson’s Extinction is not an artefact of the method used to bin data by time in previous analyses.
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Abstract:  The oldest records of mammal‐like therapsids in Laurasia are from the Ocher Complex of Russia and the Xidagou Formation of China, whereas in Gondwana they are restricted to the Eodicynodon
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