The organisation of Chinese shame concepts?

@article{Li2004TheOO,
  title={The organisation of Chinese shame concepts?},
  author={Jin Li and Lianqing Wang and Kurt W. Fischer},
  journal={Cognition and Emotion},
  year={2004},
  volume={18},
  pages={767 - 797}
}
This study examined Chinese shame concepts. By asking native Chinese to identify terms for shame, we collected 113 shame terms. Hierarchical cluster analysis of sorted terms yielded a comprehensive map of the concept. We found, at the highest abstract level, two large distinctions of “shame state, self‐focus” and “reactions to shame, other‐focus.” While the former describes various aspects of actual shame experience that focuses on the self, the latter focuses on consequences of and reactions… 
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