The optical counterpart to the γ-ray burst GRB970508

@article{Djorgovski1997TheOC,
  title={The optical counterpart to the $\gamma$-ray burst GRB970508},
  author={S. George Djorgovski and Mark Robert Metzger and Shrinivas R. Kulkarni and S. C. Odewahn and R. R. Gal and Michael Andrew Pahre and Dale A. Frail and Marco Feroci and Enrico Costa and Eliana Palazzi},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={387},
  pages={876-878}
}
Understanding the nature of the γ-ray burst phenomenon is one of the outstanding problems of modern astrophysics. The identification of counterparts at optical wavelengths is considered a crucial factor for determining the origin of these events. Here we report the detection and temporal properties of a variable optical source, which has been identified, as the counterpart of the X-ray transient associated with the γ-ray burst GRB970508 (ref. 3). The initial optical images were obtained only 5… 

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