The onset of pain related behaviours following partial beak amputation in the chicken

@article{Gentle1991TheOO,
  title={The onset of pain related behaviours following partial beak amputation in the chicken},
  author={Michael J. Gentle and Louise N. Hunter and D. Waddington},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={1991},
  volume={128},
  pages={113-116}
}
Minor beak trimming in chickens leads to loss of mechanoreception and magnetoreception.
TLDR
It is concluded that minor beak trimming at a young age did not result in pain in young domestic chicks, but instead led to impaired function of the magnetoreceptor and mechanoreceptors of the beak.
Evaluation of a fracture pain model in domestic pigeons (Columba livia).
TLDR
The fracture pain model was reliable and reproducible and may be useful for experimental studies involving postsurgical pain in pigeons, and the weight-bearing load differential was a sensitive, specific, reliable, and indirect measure of fracture-associated pain.
Neurobiological basis of sensory perception: welfare implications of beak trimming.
TLDR
Data show that removing 50% or less of the beak of chicks can prevent the formation of neuromas and allow regeneration of keratinized tissue to prevent deformed beaks and therefore positively affect the quality of life of birds during their lifetime.
Pain issues in poultry
Nociceptors in the legs of poultry: implications for potential pain in pre-slaughter shackling.
TLDR
It was concluded that shackling of commercial poultry involves the insertion of each leg into parallel metal slots and holding the bird inverted for a period of time before stunning and slaughter.
8 Pain Management
TLDR
This work has shown that the ability to communicate in no way negates the possibility that an individual is experiencing pain and is in need of appropriate painrelieving treatment, which gives credibility to pain experienced by non-verbal populations of species, including humans as well as all animal species.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 17 REFERENCES
Behavioural consequences of partial beak amputation (beak trimming) in poultry.
TLDR
The decrease in welfare to the individual bird caused by this pain will conflict with any increase inelfare to the flock brought about by beak trimming; this should be considered before any decision to beak trimmed is taken.
Muscle but not cutaneous C‐afferent input produces prolonged increases in the excitability of the flexion reflex in the rat.
TLDR
The results show that a brief C‐afferent fibre input into the spinal cord can produce a prolonged increase in the excitability of the flexion reflex and that muscle C-afferent fibres evoke longer‐lasting changes than cutaneous C fibres.
...
1
2
...