The olfactory receptor gene superfamily: data mining, classification, and nomenclature

@article{Glusman2000TheOR,
  title={The olfactory receptor gene superfamily: data mining, classification, and nomenclature},
  author={Gustavo Glusman and Anita Bahar and Dror Sharon and Yitzhak Pilpel and Julia H. M. White and Doron Lancet},
  journal={Mammalian Genome},
  year={2000},
  volume={11},
  pages={1016-1023}
}
Abstract. The vertebrate olfactory receptor (OR) subgenome harbors the largest known gene family, which has been expanded by the need to provide recognition capacity for millions of potential odorants. We implemented an automated procedure to identify all OR coding regions from published sequences. This led us to the identification of 831 OR coding regions (including pseudogenes) from 24 vertebrate species. The resulting dataset was subjected to neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis and… 
The human olfactory subgenome: from sequence to structure and evolution
TLDR
The analysis of 224 human OR genes leads to insight into the origin of OR genes, suggesting a graded expansion through mammalian evolution, and delineate a structural map of the respective proteins.
A unified nomenclature for vertebrate olfactory receptors
TLDR
The Mutual Maximum Similarity (MMS) algorithm is described, a systematic classifier for assigning a human-centric nomenclature to any OR gene based on inter-species hierarchical pairwise similarities, which consolidated a unified standard nomenClature system for the vertebrate OR superfamily.
The human olfactory receptor repertoire
TLDR
The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction.
The complete human olfactory subgenome.
TLDR
The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes.
The olfactory receptor gene superfamily of the mouse
TLDR
Human ORs cover a similar 'receptor space' as the mouse ORs, suggesting that the human olfactory system has retained the ability to recognize a broad spectrum of chemicals even though humans have lost nearly two-thirds of the OR genes as compared to mice.
Identification of olfactory receptor genes from mammalian genome sequences.
  • Y. Niimura
  • Biology, Medicine
    Methods in molecular biology
  • 2013
TLDR
A description of bioinformatics methods to identify the entire OR gene repertoires from mammalian genome sequences is presented.
The complete swine olfactory subgenome: expansion of the olfactory gene repertoire in the pig genome
TLDR
It is shown that S. scrofa has one of the largest OR repertoires, suggesting an expansion of OR genes in the swine genome, and a significant number of unique OR gene in the pig genome may suggest the presence of swine specific olfactory stimulation.
The mouse olfactory receptor gene family
  • P. Godfrey, B. Malnic, L. Buck
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2004
TLDR
This analysis of the mouse OR gene family suggests that humans and mice recognize many of the same odorant structural motifs, but mice may be superior in odor sensitivity and discrimination.
The Birth and Death of Olfactory Receptor Gene Families in Mammalian Niche Adaptation
TLDR
This study demonstrates the utility of species‐specific duplications in elucidating gene family evolution, revealing how the OR repertoire has undergone expansion and contraction with respect to a number of ecological adaptations in mammals.
Evolution of olfactory receptor genes in the human genome
  • Y. Niimura, M. Nei
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2003
TLDR
The complete set of OR genes and their chromosomal locations from the latest human genome sequences are identified and it is shown that the class II OR genes can further be classified into 19 phylogenetic clades supported by high bootstrap values.
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