The olfactory nerve: a shortcut for influenza and other viral diseases into the central nervous system

@article{vanRiel2015TheON,
  title={The olfactory nerve: a shortcut for influenza and other viral diseases into the central nervous system},
  author={Debby van Riel and Robert M. Verdijk and Thijs Kuiken},
  journal={The Journal of Pathology},
  year={2015},
  volume={235}
}
The olfactory nerve consists mainly of olfactory receptor neurons and directly connects the nasal cavity with the central nervous system (CNS). Each olfactory receptor neuron projects a dendrite into the nasal cavity on the apical side, and on the basal side extends its axon through the cribriform plate into the olfactory bulb of the brain. Viruses that can use the olfactory nerve as a shortcut into the CNS include influenza A virus, herpesviruses, poliovirus, paramyxoviruses, vesicular… Expand
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