The number, speed, and impact of plastid endosymbioses in eukaryotic evolution.

@article{Keeling2013TheNS,
  title={The number, speed, and impact of plastid endosymbioses in eukaryotic evolution.},
  author={Patrick J. Keeling},
  journal={Annual review of plant biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={64},
  pages={
          583-607
        }
}
  • P. Keeling
  • Published 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of plant biology
Plastids (chloroplasts) have long been recognized to have originated by endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium, but their subsequent evolutionary history has proved complex because they have also moved between eukaryotes during additional rounds of secondary and tertiary endosymbioses. Much of this history has been revealed by genomic analyses, but some debates remain unresolved, in particular those relating to secondary red plastids of the chromalveolates, especially cryptomonads. Here, I examine… Expand
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