The nuclear-bound form of the progesterone receptor is generated through a hormone-dependent phosphorylation.

Abstract

The solubilized ("cytosolic") receptor present in the rabbit uterus in the absence of hormone and the chromatin-bound ("nuclear") receptor obtained after injection of a progestin were compared. Crude cellular extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting and receptors were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. With both methods it was observed that the electrophoretic mobility of the "nuclear" receptor was slower than that of the "cytosolic" receptor. This difference in mobility appeared to be due to the existence of variably phosphorylated forms of receptor. The phosphorylation reaction was examined in uterine slices. In the absence of hormone the cytosolic receptor was phosphorylated. When hormone was added the phosphorylation of receptor was markedly enhanced and the electrophoretic mobility of the "nuclear" receptor was decreased. These experiments thus show that the receptor in its "cytosolic" form is a phosphoprotein. Under the effect of the hormone the receptor is further phosphorylated on some supplementary site(s). This polyphosphoprotein is the chromatin-bound, putatively active, form of the receptor. In this respect the intracellular progesterone receptor is similar to various membrane receptors for hormones and growth factors which are phosphorylated upon binding of their ligand.

Cite this paper

@article{Logeat1985TheNF, title={The nuclear-bound form of the progesterone receptor is generated through a hormone-dependent phosphorylation.}, author={Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Logeat and Martine Le Cunff and Regine Pamphile and Edwin Milgrom}, journal={Biochemical and biophysical research communications}, year={1985}, volume={131 1}, pages={421-7} }