The notion of unitary psychosis: a conceptual history

@article{Berros1994TheNO,
  title={The notion of unitary psychosis: a conceptual history},
  author={Germ{\'a}n E. Berr{\'i}os and Dominic Beer},
  journal={History of Psychiatry},
  year={1994},
  volume={5},
  pages={013 - 36}
}
'Unitary psychosis' is the collective name for a set of disparate doctrines whose common denominator is the view that there is only one form of psychosis and that its diverse clinical presentations can be explained in terms of endogenous and exogenous factors. This paper examines the history of these doctrines since the eighteenth century in the work of their main sponsors and extricates their conceptual assumptions. It is shown that the nature of the debate between 'unitarians' and those who… 
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Obituary Notice
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Dr Jens Nielsen a member of the editorial board of the journal Plant Protection Science (from 1994 to 2010) passed away on February 4, 2013 in Winnipeg at the age of 85 years. He was born in
Ziele und Wege der psychiatrischen Forschung
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