The nose of the sperm whale: overviews of functional design, structural homologies and evolution

@article{Huggenberger2014TheNO,
  title={The nose of the sperm whale: overviews of functional design, structural homologies and evolution},
  author={Stefan Huggenberger and Michel Andr{\'e} and Helmut H. A. Oelschläger},
  journal={Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom},
  year={2014},
  volume={96},
  pages={783 - 806}
}
The hypertrophic and much elongated epicranial (nasal) complex of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) is a unique device to increase directionality and source levels of echolocation clicks in aquatic environments. The size and shape of the nasal fat bodies as well as the peculiar organization of the air sac system in the nasal sound generator of sperm whales are in favour of this proposed specialized acoustic function. The morphology of the sperm whale nose, including a ‘connecting acoustic… 
Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat
TLDR
Results are consistent with the hypothesis that the unique structure of the junk evolved to function as a massive battering ram during male-male competition.
Properties and architecture of the sperm whale skull amphitheatre.
TLDR
It is contended that the amphitheatre will flex elastically to equilibrate forces transmitted via the spermaceti organ that arise through diving, and has relevance as an energy absorptive structure in diving.
Ontogeny and evolution of the sound-generating structures in the infraorder Delphinida (Odontoceti: Delphinida)
TLDR
Broadband vocalizing delphinidans might have evolved under heterochronic events acting on the formation of sound-generating structures such as the rostrum and vestibular air sacs, and on the transformation of the branches of the melon, probably leading to a reduced directionality of the sonar beam.
Sound Generating Structures of the Humpback Dolphin Sousa plumbea (Cuvier, 1829) and the Directionality in Dolphin Sounds.
TLDR
The Indian Ocean humpback dolphin may represent a useful comparative model to the bottlenose dolphin to provide insights into the functional anatomy of the sound production in dolphins, since these coastal dolphins exhibit similar body size and share similarities on acoustic behavior.
Macroraptorial sperm whales (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Physeteroidea) from the Miocene of Peru
TLDR
A phylogenetic analysis based on 53 characters and 21 physeteroid species confirms the monophyly of Acrophyseter and groups this genus with the larger, middle to late Miocene macroraptorial stem physeteroids Brygmophyseter and Zygophyseter.
Evolution of cranial telescoping in echolocating whales (Cetacea: Odontoceti)
TLDR
The earliest diverging fossil odontocetes were found to exhibit a lesser degree of cranial telescoping than later diverging but contemporary whale taxa, and the Oligocene was a period of unusually high diversity and evolution in whale skull morphology, with little subsequent evolution in telescoping.
Anatomy of Underwater Sound Production With a Focus on Ultrasonic Vocalization in Toothed Whales Including Dolphins and Porpoises
TLDR
Underwater sound production occurs in aquatic mammals, including cetaceans (whales, including dolphins and porpoises), and there is ample experimental proof that the odontocete nasal region produces USVs.
A new longirostrine sperm whale (Cetacea, Physeteroidea) from the lower Miocene of the Pisco Basin (southern coast of Peru)
TLDR
A new genus and species of physeteroid is described and phylogenetic analysis recovers R. valenciae as one of the earliest branching stem physeteroids, interpreted as part of a mechanism leading to the loss of apical and subapical upper teeth in sperm whales during the Miocene.
Wave Propagation in the Biosonar Organ of sperm whales using a Finite Difference Time Domain method
The bio-sonar of sperm whales presents many specific characteristics, such as its size, its loudness or its vocalization abilities. Furthermore it fulfills several roles in their foraging and social
Scaphokogia totajpe, sp. nov., a New Bulky-Faced Pygmy Sperm Whale (Kogiidae) from the Late Miocene of Peru
TLDR
The cranial morphology of Scaphokogia totajpe indicates that the extent of the nasal complex was greater than in modern kogiids, and highlights a late Miocene diversity peak for sperm whales in the global oceans, before the Pliocene odontocete turnover.
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 172 REFERENCES
An acoustic valve within the nose of sperm whales Physeter macrocephalus
TLDR
This interpretation of the right nasal passage as an adaptive acoustic valve elucidates why the spermaceti organ and the junk are separated from each other by an air-filled space of variable volume crossing the sound path of the bent acoustic horn' in the posterior part of the nasal complex.
Histological analysis of the nasal roof cartilage in a neonate sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus – Mammalia, Odontoceti)
TLDR
The nasal roof cartilage of a neonate sperm whale was examined by gross dissection and routine histology and showed characteristics of immature and growing cartilaginous tissue, which could explain its hyaline character in the adult.
Evolution of the Nasal Anatomy of Cetaceans
TLDR
An overview of the salient points in the evolution of the nasal morphology is provided and some of the selection pressures that might have created the present diversity of nasal morphologies are speculated about.
[Morphogenesis of the highly specialized nasal skull in the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). I].
TLDR
Investigated the morphogenesis of the nasal structures of the chondrocranium and determatocranium in 15 embryos and foetuses of the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), suggesting a close phylogenetic relationship between Physeter and the other Odontoceti.
Functional Morphology of the Hyolaryngeal Complex of the Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena): Implications for its Role in Sound Production and Respiration
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the hyoid apparatus, reminiscent of a “swinging cage,” may not only be a stable framework in which the larynx can move but should support laryngeal actions by its own movements.
Functional Morphology of the Nasal Complex in the Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena L.)
TLDR
The morphological data presented here substantiate and extend the unified “phonic lips” hypothesis of sound generation in toothed whales suggested by Cranford et al. (J Morphol 1996;228:223–285).
The comparative anatomy of the nasal tract and the function of the spermaceti organ in the Physeteridae (Mammalia, Odontoceti)
TLDR
The spermaceti organ unique to the Physeteridae forms a part of the functional morphology of the right naris and is not a bilaterally symmetrical structure like the melon of other odontocetes.
Development of the Cetacean Nasal Skull
  • P. D. M. Klima
  • Biology, Medicine
    Advances in Anatomy, Embryology and Cell Biology
  • 1999
TLDR
The comparison of morphogeny of the nasal skull has made it possible to draw certain conclusions on the phylogeny and systematics of Cetacea, which thus form a single monophyletic order.
[Histologic studies of cartilaginous structures in the anterior region of the head of the sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus].
  • M. Klíma
  • Biology, Medicine
    Gegenbaurs morphologisches Jahrbuch
  • 1990
Recently discovered cartilaginous structures in the forehead of the sperm whale (Behrmann and Klima 1985) were investigated histologically. The largest and most important of these structures is the
Sound transmission in the nose of the sperm whale Physeter catodon. A post mortem study
  • B. Møhl
  • Geology, Medicine
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 2001
TLDR
Experimental evidence supports the Norris and Harvey (1972) theory of click generation in the spermaceti organ, which is composed of a primary event, followed by a train of reflected pulses, spaced by the time required for the event to travel back and forth between air sacs (reflectors) at each end of the organ.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...