The non‐standard genetic code of Candida spp.: an evolving genetic code or a novel mechanism for adaptation?

@article{Santos1997TheNG,
  title={The non‐standard genetic code of Candida spp.: an evolving genetic code or a novel mechanism for adaptation?},
  author={M. A. S. Santos and Takuya Ueda and K. Watanabe and Mick F. Tuite},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={26}
}
A number of yeasts of the genus Candida translate the standard leucine‐CUG codon as serine. This unique genetic code change is the only known alteration to the universal genetic code in cytoplasmic mRNAs, of either eukaryotes or prokaryotes, which involves reassignment of a sense codon. Translation of CUG as serine in these species is mediated by a novel serine‐tRNA (ser‐tRNACAG), which uniquely has a guanosine at position 33, 5′ to the anticodon, a position that is almost invariably occupied… Expand
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