The neuroscience of learning: beyond the Hebbian synapse.

@article{Gallistel2013TheNO,
  title={The neuroscience of learning: beyond the Hebbian synapse.},
  author={Charles R. Gallistel and Louis D Matzel},
  journal={Annual review of psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={64},
  pages={
          169-200
        }
}
From the traditional perspective of associative learning theory, the hypothesis linking modifications of synaptic transmission to learning and memory is plausible. It is less so from an information-processing perspective, in which learning is mediated by computations that make implicit commitments to physical and mathematical principles governing the domains where domain-specific cognitive mechanisms operate. We compare the properties of associative learning and memory to the properties of long… Expand
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