The neuropsychological and neuroradiological correlates of slowly progressive visual agnosia

@article{Giovagnoli2009TheNA,
  title={The neuropsychological and neuroradiological correlates of slowly progressive visual agnosia},
  author={Anna Rita Giovagnoli and Anna Aresi and Fabiola Reati and Alice Keefer Riva and Clara Gobbo and Alberto Bizzi},
  journal={Neurological Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={30},
  pages={123-131}
}
The case of a 64-year-old woman affected by slowly progressive visual agnosia is reported aiming to describe specific cognitive-brain relationships. Longitudinal clinical and neuropsychological assessment, combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography (PET) were used. Sequential neuropsychological evaluations performed during a period of 9 years since disease onset showed the appearance of apperceptive and associative visual agnosia, alexia… CONTINUE READING

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