The neurology of syntax: Language use without Broca's area

@article{Grodzinsky2000TheNO,
  title={The neurology of syntax: Language use without Broca's area},
  author={Yosef Grodzinsky},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={23},
  pages={1 - 21}
}
  • Y. Grodzinsky
  • Published 1 February 2000
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that most human linguistic abilities are not localized in this region. In particular, most of syntax (long thought to be there) is not located in Broca's area and its vicinity (operculum, insula, and subjacent white matter). This cerebral region, implicated in Broca's aphasia, does have a role in syntactic processing, but a highly specific one: It is the neural home to… 
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