The neurodevelopmental basis of sex differences in schizophrenia.

@article{Castle1991TheNB,
  title={The neurodevelopmental basis of sex differences in schizophrenia.},
  author={David Jonathan Castle and Robin M. Murray},
  journal={Psychological medicine},
  year={1991},
  volume={21 3},
  pages={
          565-75
        }
}
Male schizophrenics tend to manifest a severe form of the disease, characterized by early onset, poor pre-morbid adjustment, 'typical' and 'negative' symptoms, and poor outcome; they are more likely than their female counterparts to have a history of preor peri-natal complications, and to exhibit structural brain abnormalities. The most plausible explanation for these differences is that more male than female schizophrenics have a form of disease due to neurodevelopmental anomaly. This… Expand
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