The neurobiology of stress and gastrointestinal disease

@article{Mayer2000TheNO,
  title={The neurobiology of stress and gastrointestinal disease},
  author={E. Mayer},
  journal={Gut},
  year={2000},
  volume={47},
  pages={861 - 869}
}
  • E. Mayer
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • Gut
  • The role of stress in the modulation of the most common gastrointestinal disorders has traditionally been considered a domain of psychology, and has frequently been lumped together with the role of psychiatric comorbidity. Among clinicians, the term “stress” is generally taken as synonymous with psychological (“exteroceptive”) stress. Based on the deeply ingrained Cartesian view in medicine and gastroenterology, stress and psychological factors have been considered fundamentally separate and… CONTINUE READING

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