The neurobiology of language beyond single words.

@article{Hagoort2014TheNO,
  title={The neurobiology of language beyond single words.},
  author={Peter Hagoort and Peter Indefrey},
  journal={Annual review of neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={37},
  pages={
          347-62
        }
}
A hallmark of human language is that we combine lexical building blocks retrieved from memory in endless new ways. This combinatorial aspect of language is referred to as unification. Here we focus on the neurobiological infrastructure for syntactic and semantic unification. Unification is characterized by a high-speed temporal profile including both prediction and integration of retrieved lexical elements. A meta-analysis of numerous neuroimaging studies reveals a clear dorsal/ventral gradient… Expand
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