The neurobiology of antiepileptic drugs

@article{Rogawski2004TheNO,
  title={The neurobiology of antiepileptic drugs},
  author={Michael A Rogawski and Wolfgang L{\"o}scher},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={553-564}
}
Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) provide satisfactory control of seizures for most patients with epilepsy. The drugs have the remarkable ability to protect against seizures while permitting normal functioning of the nervous system. AEDs act on diverse molecular targets to selectively modify the excitability of neurons so that seizure-related firing is blocked without disturbing non-epileptic activity. This occurs largely through effects on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels, or by promoting… Expand
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