The neuroanatomy of Juan Valverde de Amusco and medicine at the time of the Spanish renaissance

@article{MartnAraguz2001TheNO,
  title={The neuroanatomy of Juan Valverde de Amusco and medicine at the time of the Spanish renaissance},
  author={A Mart{\'i}nAraguz and C BustamanteMart{\'i}nez and D ToledoLe{\'o}n and M L{\'o}pezG{\'o}mez and Moreno Mart{\'i}nez Jm},
  journal={Revista De Neurologia},
  year={2001},
  volume={32},
  pages={788}
}
Juan Valverde de Amusco (c. 1525-c. 1564) is considered to have been the most important Spanish anatomist of the XVI century. A follower of Vesalius, he increased and divulged knowledge of anatomy during the Renaissance and his book The history of the composition of the human body was printed in Rome in 1556. The objective of this paper is to study the neuroanatomy in this book and present unpublished biographical data and describe the main contributions of this Castilian doctor to the… 
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