The neural processing of 3‐D visual information: evidence from eye movements

@article{Miles1998TheNP,
  title={The neural processing of 3‐D visual information: evidence from eye movements},
  author={Frederick A. Miles},
  journal={European Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={1998},
  volume={10}
}
  • F. A. Miles
  • Published 1 March 1998
  • Psychology, Biology
  • European Journal of Neuroscience
Primates have several reflexes that generate eye movements to compensate for bodily movements that would otherwise disturb their gaze and undermine their ability to process visual information. Two vestibulo‐ocular reflexes compensate selectively for rotational and translational disturbances of the head, and each has visual backups that operate as negative feedback tracking mechanisms to deal with any residual disturbances of gaze. Of particular interest here are three recently discovered visual… 

The role of MST neurons during ocular tracking in 3D space.

Short‐Latency Visual Stabilization Mechanisms that Help to Compensate for Translational Disturbances of Gaze

  • F. A. Miles
  • Biology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1999
Three short‐latency visual tracking mechanisms that help to stabilize the eyes during translational disturbances of the observer operate as backups to otolith‐mediated vestibulo‐ocular reflexes, and all are mediated by the medial superior temporal area of cortex.

The visual back-up to the VOR: ocular tracking systems with ultra-short latencies and the role of the MST area

The results strongly support the hypothesis that the MST area of the cerebral cortex is a primary site for producing the three visual tracking eye movements at ultra-short latencies.

The Role of Inertial and Visual Mechanisms in the Stabilization of Gaze in Natural and Artificial Systems

A major objective of this chapter is to review recent work on low-level, pre-attentive mechanisms that operate with ultra-short latencies and are largely independent of conscious perception.

Foveal Versus Full-Field Visual Stabilization Strategies for Translational and Rotational Head Movements

Three-dimensional ocular kinematics during lateral translation and rotational movements with those during pursuit of a small moving target in four rhesus monkeys are compared to provide additional support for a functional difference in the two vestibular-driven mechanisms for visual stability during rotations and translations.

Foveal Visual Strategy during Self-Motion Is Independent of Spatial Attention

The foveal stabilization strategy is invariant and solely dependent on current eye position, a strategy that is optimal for both processing speed and efficiency in the extraction of heading information from retinal flow during self-motion.

Similar kinematic properties for ocular following and smooth pursuit eye movements.

It is found that the OFR followed kinematic properties similar to those seen in pursuit and the TVOR with the eye-position-dependent torsional tilt of eye velocity having slopes that averaged 0.73 +/-0.16 for OFR and 0.57 +/- 0.12 (means +/- SD) for pursuit.

Eyes on target: what neurons must do for the vestibuloocular reflex during linear motion.

A summary of what is known about the functional properties and neural substrates for this oculomotor system and some specific hypotheses about how sensory information is centrally processed to create motor commands for the VORs are outlined.

Motor scaling by viewing distance of early visual motion signals during smooth pursuit.

Whether initial eye velocity and acceleration during the open-loop portion of step ramp pursuit scales with target distance is investigated in rhesus monkeys and the results suggest that the neural substrates for motor scaling by target distance remain largely distinct from the main pathway for pursuit.

Sensory-to-motor processing of the ocular-following response

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