The neural correlates of memory encoding and recognition for own-race and other-race faces

@article{Herzmann2011TheNC,
  title={The neural correlates of memory encoding and recognition for own-race and other-race faces},
  author={Grit Herzmann and Verena Willenbockel and James W. Tanaka and Tim Curran},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2011},
  volume={49},
  pages={3103-3115}
}
People are generally better at recognizing faces from their own race than from a different race, as has been shown in numerous behavioral studies. Here we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate how differences between own-race and other-race faces influence the neural correlates of memory encoding and recognition. ERPs of Asian and Caucasian participants were recorded during the study and test phases of a Remember-Know paradigm with Chinese and Caucasian faces. A behavioral other… Expand

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