The neural basis of human moral cognition

@article{Moll2005TheNB,
  title={The neural basis of human moral cognition},
  author={Jorge Moll and Roland Zahn and Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza and Frank Krueger and Jordan Henry Grafman},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={6},
  pages={799-809}
}
Moral cognitive neuroscience is an emerging field of research that focuses on the neural basis of uniquely human forms of social cognition and behaviour. Recent functional imaging and clinical evidence indicates that a remarkably consistent network of brain regions is involved in moral cognition. These findings are fostering new interpretations of social behavioural impairments in patients with brain dysfunction, and require new approaches to enable us to understand the complex links between… 

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