The neural bases of complex tool use in humans

@article{JohnsonFrey2004TheNB,
  title={The neural bases of complex tool use in humans},
  author={Scott H. Johnson-Frey},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={71-78}
}

Figures from this paper

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It is argued here that the ways in which humans skilfully use tools and other manipulable artefacts is possible owing to adaptations that integrate sensory–motor and cognitive processes.
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There are already sufficient data from neuropsychology to strongly constrain extant hypotheses about the representation of conceptual knowledge in the brain, and this conclusion compels a reconsideration of the role played by motor planning and/or execution processes in action and object recognition and understanding.
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How we interact with objects: learning from brain lesions
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TLDR
Findings from two fMRI studies of healthy, right-handed adults in which an event-related design was used to distinguish regions involved in planning and executing tool use gestures with the dominant right and non-dominant left hands are reported.
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