The neural and neurocomputational bases of recovery from post-stroke aphasia

@article{Stefaniak2019TheNA,
  title={The neural and neurocomputational bases of recovery from post-stroke aphasia},
  author={James D. Stefaniak and Ajay D. Halai and Matthew. A. Lambon Ralph},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neurology},
  year={2019},
  volume={16},
  pages={43-55}
}
Language impairment, or aphasia, is a disabling symptom that affects at least one third of individuals after stroke. Some affected individuals will spontaneously recover partial language function. However, despite a growing number of investigations, our understanding of how and why this recovery occurs is very limited. This Review proposes that existing hypotheses about language recovery after stroke can be conceptualized as specific examples of two fundamental principles. The first principle… Expand
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