The neglected cranial nerve: Nervus terminalis (cranial nerve N)

@article{Vilensky2014TheNC,
  title={The neglected cranial nerve: Nervus terminalis (cranial nerve N)},
  author={Joel A. Vilensky},
  journal={Clinical Anatomy},
  year={2014},
  volume={27}
}
  • J. Vilensky
  • Published 1 January 2014
  • Biology
  • Clinical Anatomy
The nervus terminalis (NT; terminal nerve) was clearly identified as an additional cranial nerve in humans more than a century ago yet remains mostly undescribed in modern anatomy textbooks. The nerve is referred to as the nervus terminalis because in species initially examined its fibers were seen entering the brain in the region of the lamina terminalis. It has also been referred to as cranial nerve 0, but because there is no Roman symbol for zero, an N for the Latin word nulla is a better… 
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TLDR
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Vertebrate origins and architecture
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 46 REFERENCES
Nervus terminalis (cranial nerve zero) in the adult human.
TLDR
It is concluded that the terminal nerve is a common finding in the adult human brain, confirming early light microscopic reports.
Terminal nerve complex.
TLDR
The functions of TN components are not yet well identified, but some indications are that it is sensory but not chemosensory, controls blood vessels and glands in the nose and has peptide-containing fibers that may control reproductive development and behavior as well as other neural functions.
Nervus terminalis derived from the neural crest? A surprising new turn in a century-old debate.
TLDR
A recent fate-mapping study in zebrafish challenged the dogma of an olfactory placode origin for nervus terminalis cells, and suggested that at least some of these cells derive from the neural crest.
The nervus terminalis of the guinea pig: A new luteinizing hormone‐releasing hormone (LHRH) neuronal system
TLDR
LHRH‐immunoreactive cells and axons of the nervus terminalis are in intimate contact with cerebral blood vessels and the cerebrospinal fluid along the intracranial course of this nerve, deep to the meninges.
A note on the course and distribution of the nervus terminalis in man
TLDR
Observations on the intracranial course and nasal distribution of the nervus terminalis in man are reported based on gross dissections of prepared specimens of the heads of several human fetuses varying in age from ten weeks to the newborn.
Development of the nervus terminalis: Origin and migration
  • K. Whitlock
  • Biology
    Microscopy research and technique
  • 2004
TLDR
A picture is emerging in which the origin of at least a subset of the nervus terminalis cells lies in the cranial neural crest, and the data surrounding this finding will be discussed in light of recent findings on neural crest and placode origins.
XXXVII The Nervus Terminalis
TLDR
The secretion of Bowman's glands is a serous fluid which bathes the surface of the olfactory epithelium and provides a solvent for the odor carrying substances and must also serve by its flow to wash away these substances so fresh odoriferous material can exercise its effect.
Development of the Nervus Terminalis in Mammals Including Toothed Whales and Humans
TLDR
The early ontogenesis and topography of the mammalian terminalis system was investigated in 43 microslide series of toothed whale and human embryos and fetuses and it is shown that the autonomic component has been enlarged in the course of perfect adaptation to an aquatic environment.
The prairie vole vomeronasal organ is a target for gonadotropin-releasing hormone.
TLDR
The hypothesis that GnRH is released from nervus terminalis fibers to modulate chemosensory processes, especially those involving chemoreception in the vomeronasal organ is supported.
Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice
TLDR
The Anatomical Nomenclature of the Nervous System and Systemic Overview of the Endocrine System, Principles of Hormone Production and Secretion and Development of the Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems are presented.
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