The negative side of social interaction: impact on psychological well-being.

@article{Rook1984TheNS,
  title={The negative side of social interaction: impact on psychological well-being.},
  author={Karen S Rook},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={1984},
  volume={46 5},
  pages={
          1097-1108
        }
}
  • K. Rook
  • Published 1 May 1984
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
Social exchange theory has long emphasized that social interaction entails both rewards and costs. Research on the effects of social relations on psychological well-being, however, has generally ignored the negative side of social interaction. This study examined the relative impact of positive and negative social outcomes on older women's well-being. The sample consisted of 120 widowed women between the ages of 60 and 89. Multiple regression analyses revealed that negative social outcomes were… 
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Interventions that attempt to decrease socially conflictive experiences via cognitive‐behavioral skills training, whereas concomitantly targeting positive and negative affect, could help prevent the development of full‐blown depressive episodes in vulnerable individuals.
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