The need to belong: desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation.

@article{Baumeister1995TheNT,
  title={The need to belong: desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation.},
  author={R. Baumeister and M. Leary},
  journal={Psychological bulletin},
  year={1995},
  volume={117 3},
  pages={
          497-529
        }
}
  • R. Baumeister, M. Leary
  • Published 1995
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychological bulletin
  • A hypothesized need to form and maintain strong, stable interpersonal relationships is evaluated in light of the empirical literature. The need is for frequent, nonaversive interactions within an ongoing relational bond. Consistent with the belongingness hypothesis, people form social attachments readily under most conditions and resist the dissolution of existing bonds. Belongingness appears to have multiple and strong effects on emotional patterns and on cognitive processes. Lack of… CONTINUE READING
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