The native mind: biological categorization and reasoning in development and across cultures.

@article{Medin2004TheNM,
  title={The native mind: biological categorization and reasoning in development and across cultures.},
  author={Douglas L. Medin and Scott Atran},
  journal={Psychological review},
  year={2004},
  volume={111 4},
  pages={960-83}
}
This article describes cross-cultural and developmental research on folk biology: that is, the study of how people conceptualize living kinds. The combination of a conceptual module for biology and cross-cultural comparison brings a new perspective to theories of categorization and reasoning. From the standpoint of cognitive psychology, the authors find that results gathered from standard populations in industrialized societies often fail to generalize to humanity at large. For example… CONTINUE READING

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.
92 Citations
66 References
Similar Papers

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 92 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 66 references

Cognitive foundations of natural history

  • S. 227-63. Atran
  • 1990
Highly Influential
8 Excerpts

What animals really think

  • M. Press. Hauser
  • The faculty of language. Science
  • 2000
Highly Influential
3 Excerpts

The tree of life: Universals

  • A. López, S. Atran, J. Coley, D. Medin, E. Smith
  • 1997
Highly Influential
3 Excerpts

Race and the Education of Desire

  • A. Stoler
  • Stross, B
  • 1995
Highly Influential
3 Excerpts

Language and living things: Uniformities in folk classification and naming

  • C. Brown
  • 1984
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

Essentialism and folkbiology: Further evidence

  • P. Sousa, S. Atran, D. Medin
  • 2002
2 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…