The mystery ape of Pleistocene Asia

@article{Ciochon2009TheMA,
  title={The mystery ape of Pleistocene Asia},
  author={Russell L. Ciochon},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2009},
  volume={459},
  pages={910-911}
}
Fossil finds of early humans in southeast Asia may actually be the remains of an unknown ape. Russell Ciochon says that many palaeoanthropologists — including himself — have been mistaken. 
Out of Africa I: The First Hominin Colonization of Eurasia
”For over two-thirds of our evolutionary history, from our divergence from chimpanzees more than 6 million years ago, until as recently as 2 million years ago, hominins were an endemic African group.
Out of Africa I: The First Hominin Colonization of Eurasia
”For over two-thirds of our evolutionary history, from our divergence from chimpanzees more than 6 million years ago, until as recently as 2 million years ago, hominins were an endemic African group.
Gigantopithecus blacki: a giant ape from the Pleistocene of Asia revisited.
TLDR
Gigantopithecus blacki exhibits a relatively high degree of sexual dimorphism, implying a high level of male-male competition, but the relatively small canines in both sexes suggest that these teeth were not important in agonistic behaviors.
Divorcing Hominins from the Stegodon-Ailuropoda Fauna: New Views on the Antiquity of Hominins in Asia
The distinctive Stegodon-Ailuropoda fauna of southern China and peninsular Southeast Asia is known to include a number of ape species no longer present today. Among these apes, it is becoming
Evidence for increased hominid diversity in the Early to Middle Pleistocene of Indonesia
TLDR
Results confirm the presence of Meganthropus as a Pleistocene Indonesian hominid distinct from Pongo, Gigantopithecus and Homo, and reveal that Dubois’s H. erectus paratype molars from 1891 are not hominin (human lineage), but instead are more likely to belong to Meganthrops.
The Middle Pleistocene vertebrate fauna from Khok Sung (Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand): biochronological and paleobiogeographical implications
TLDR
The Khok Sung large mammal assemblage mostly comprises mainland Southeast Asian taxa that migrated to Java during the latest Middle Pleistocene, supporting the hypothesis that Thailand was a biogeographic pathway for the Sino-Malayan migration event from South China to Java.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-5 OF 5 REFERENCES
Palaeoanthropology: Asian Homo erectus converges in time
Re-evaluation of the age of Zhoukoudian, a prominent site of Homo erectus occupation in China, prompts a rethink of the species' distribution in both the temperate north and the equatorial south of
Early Homo and associated artefacts from Asia
TLDR
The hominid dentition and stone tools from Longgupo Cave are comparable in age and morphology with early representives of the genus Homo (H. habilis and H. ergaster) and the Oldowan technology in East Africa.
Longgupo: EarlyHomo colonizer or late plioceneLufengpithecus survivor in south China?
TLDR
It is believed that the Longgupo mandible represents the relic survival of a Late Miocene ape lineage into a period just prior to the dispersal of hominids into southeastern Asia, with some female dental features that parallel the hominid condition.
A newly discovered Gigantopithecus fauna from Sanhe Cave, Chongzuo, Guangxi, South China
Among the most important faunas in the Late Cenozoic, the Gigantopithecus faunas have received a good deal of attention. The Gigantopithecus fauna recently discovered in Sanhe Cave consists of more
A stomatin-like protein necessary for mechanosensation in C. elegans
TLDR
The results indicate that MEC-2 links the mechanosensory channel and the microtubule cytoskeleton of the touch receptors of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, providing the basis for a mechanism of mechanosensation whereby microtubules displacement leads to channel opening.