The multiple faces of caveolae

@article{Parton2007TheMF,
  title={The multiple faces of caveolae},
  author={R. Parton and K. Simons},
  journal={Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={8},
  pages={185-194}
}
Caveolae are a highly abundant but enigmatic feature of mammalian cells. They form remarkably stable membrane domains at the plasma membrane but can also function as carriers in the exocytic and endocytic pathways. The apparently diverse functions of caveolae, including mechanosensing and lipid regulation, might be linked to their ability to respond to plasma membrane changes, a property that is dependent on their specialized lipid composition and biophysical properties. 
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