Corpus ID: 208492405

The moths and butterflies of Great Britain and Ireland. Volume 10. Noctuidae (Cuculliinae to Hypeninae) and Agaristidae.

@inproceedings{Heath1983TheMA,
  title={The moths and butterflies of Great Britain and Ireland. Volume 10. Noctuidae (Cuculliinae to Hypeninae) and Agaristidae.},
  author={Julian Heath and A. Maitland Emmet},
  year={1983}
}
Host-plant patch qualities and presence of a likely competitor species affect the distribution and abundance of a rare British moth, Cucullia lychnitis
TLDR
Environmental variability among patches was investigated and larvae of C. lychnitis were significantly more likely to be found on taller plants with more flower spikes; such plants are typical of established rather than newly-created patches. Expand
Biological Flora of the British Isles: Milium effusum
1. This account presents information on all aspects of the biology of Milium effusum L. (Wood Millet) that are relevant to understanding its ecological characteristics and behaviour. The main topicExpand
Invertebrate species at risk from Ash Dieback in the UK
TLDR
It is shown that among highly associated species that are phytophagous, Privet was the most frequent alternative plant used and could be used to help mitigate the effects of Ash Dieback in limited localised situations, where rare species might be affected. Expand
Moths count: recording moths for conservation in the UK
TLDR
Initial results are presented which show that substantial changes are already evident for macro-moths in the UK, and provisional distribution trends corroborated both positive and negative population-level changes assessed previously. Expand
Biological Flora of the British Isles : Rubus vestitus Weihe
TLDR
This account reviews information on all aspects of the biology of Rubus vestitus that are relevant to understanding its ecological characteristics and behaviour and is the first account of a bramble in the Biological Flora of the British Isles. Expand
Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Anchusa strigosa and their antifeedant activity.
TLDR
The pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) content of flowers, leaves, and roots of Anchusa strigosa (Boraginaceae) was analysed by ESI-LC-MS and indicated that the highest total concentration of PAs was in the leaves, followed by the flowers, and finally by the roots. Expand
The “Raison D'être” of pyrrolizidine alkaloids inCynoglossum officinale: Deterrent effects against generalist herbivores
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the skewed distribution of PAs over the leaves of rosette plants reflects optimal defense distribution within the plant and that the oldest leaves were relatively more damaged by herbivores than the youngest leaves. Expand
Feeding Specialisation and Host Distribution of British and Finnish Prunus Feeding Macrolepidoptera
TLDR
Of 81 macrolepidopteran species found in both Britain and Finland, 46 feed on Prunus species in both countries, nevertheless certain host specific species in Finland are generalists in Britain and vice versa. Expand