The morphology and behavior of dimorphic males in Perdita portalis (Hymenoptera : Andrenidae)

@article{Danforth2004TheMA,
  title={The morphology and behavior of dimorphic males in Perdita portalis (Hymenoptera : Andrenidae)},
  author={Bryan N. Danforth},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={29},
  pages={235-247}
}
  • B. Danforth
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryIn Perdita portalis, a ground nesting, communal bee, males are clearly dimorphic. The two male morphs are easily distinguished based on head size and shape into (1) a flight-capable, small-headed (SH) morph that resembles the males of other closely related species and (2) a flightless, large-headed (LH) morph that possesses numerous derived traits, such as reduced compound eyes, enlarged facial foveae and fully atrophied indirect flight muscles. The SH morph occurs exclusively on flowers… Expand

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