The molecular basis of quantitative fibrinogen disorders

@article{Asselta2006TheMB,
  title={The molecular basis of quantitative fibrinogen disorders},
  author={Rosanna Asselta and Stefano Duga and Maria Luisa Tenchini},
  journal={Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis},
  year={2006},
  volume={4}
}
Summary.  Hereditary fibrinogen disorders include type I deficiencies (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia, i.e. quantitative defects), with low or unmeasurable levels of immunoreactive protein; and type II deficiencies (dysfibrinogenemia and hypodysfibrinogenemia, i.e. qualitative defects), showing normal or altered antigen levels associated with reduced coagulant activity. While dysfibrinogenemias are in most cases autosomal dominant disorders, type I deficiencies are generally inherited… 
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