The modern theory of biological evolution: an expanded synthesis

@article{Kutschera2004TheMT,
  title={The modern theory of biological evolution: an expanded synthesis},
  author={Ulrich Kutschera and Karl J. Niklas},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2004},
  volume={91},
  pages={255-276}
}
In 1858, two naturalists, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, independently proposed natural selection as the basic mechanism responsible for the origin of new phenotypic variants and, ultimately, new species. A large body of evidence for this hypothesis was published in Darwin’s Origin of Species one year later, the appearance of which provoked other leading scientists like August Weismann to adopt and amplify Darwin’s perspective. Weismann’s neo-Darwinian theory of evolution was further… 
Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species, directional selection, and the evolutionary sciences today
TLDR
The five theories that can be extracted from Darwin’s monograph are summarized, the true meaning of the phrase “struggle for life” is explained, and Darwin's original concept of natural selection in populations of animals and plants is outlined.
Can Modern Evolutionary Theory Explain Macroevolution
TLDR
It is concluded that although several proposed extensions and seemingly unorthodox ideas have some merit, the observations they purport to explain can mostly be interpreted within the framework of the Synthetic Theory.
Darwin’s Philosophical Imperative and the Furor Theologicus
In 1859 Charles Darwin submitted a manuscript entitled “An Abstract of an Essay on the Origin of Species and Varieties through Natural Selection” to John Murray III, who published the text under the
Darwin's Hypotheses on the Origin of Domestic Animals and the History of German Shepherd Dogs
TLDR
It is shown that Darwin's analogy between artificial and natural selection was correct: domestication involves large, heritable phenotypic changes in an animal species over many subsequent generations and hence represents a rapid evolutionary process.
Historical revisionism and the inheritance theories of Darwin and Weismann
TLDR
It is proposed that Charles Darwin and AugustWeismann understood the mechanism of epigenetic inheritance in part because each accepted the notion that external factors could modify the development, and thus the phenotype of cells, tissues, and entire organisms.
Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin’s forgotten synthesis
TLDR
This article deduces the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and defines this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.
Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913): the forgotten co-founder of the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution
TLDR
The British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913), who had to leave school aged 14 and never attended university, did extensive fieldwork, and after reading the corresponding scientific literature, Wallace postulated that species were not created, but are modified descendants of pre-existing varieties.
A Darwinian Theory of Cultural Evolution Can Promote an Evolutionary Synthesis for the Social Sciences
TLDR
It is suggested that a Darwinian theory of cultural evolution can promote an evolutionary synthesis for culture, where patterns of cultural macroevolution have been explained in terms of underlying cultural microevolutionary forces.
Why an extended evolutionary synthesis is necessary
TLDR
A renewed and extended theoretical synthesis is advocated, advocated by several authors in this issue, which overcomes many of the limitations of traditional gene-centric explanation and entails a revised understanding of the role of natural selection in the evolutionary process.
Evolution, the Extended Synthesis
In the six decades since the publication of Julian Huxley's Evolution: The Modern Synthesis, the spectacular empirical advances in the biological sciences have been accompanied by equally significant
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 185 REFERENCES
One Long Argument. Charles Darwin and the Genesis of Modern Evolutionary Thought
  • P. Bondy
  • Biology
    The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine
  • 1992
TLDR
Despite its limitations, the thoroughness of the book still shines, and both clinicians and researchers will benefit from having this concise volume, written by one of the outstanding thinkers in this area.
A comparative analysis of the Darwin-Wallace papers and the development of the concept of natural selection
TLDR
It is concluded that natural selection’s lesser known co-discoverer should be regarded as one of the most important pioneers of evolutionary biology, whose original contributions are underestimated by most contemporary scientists.
Evolution: The Modern Synthesis
TLDR
This definitive edition brings one of the most important and successful scientific books of the twentieth century back into print and includes the entire text of the 1942 edition, Huxley's introduction to the 1963 second edition (which demonstrates his continuing command of the field), and the introduction tothe 1974 third edition, written by nine experts from different areas of evolutionary biology.
Macroevolution is more than repeated rounds of microevolution
  • D. Erwin
  • Biology
    Evolution & development
  • 2000
TLDR
The attractiveness of macroevolution reflects the exhaustive documentation of large‐scale patterns which reveal a richness to evolution unexplained by microevolution, and studies from paleontology, phylogenetics, developmental biology, and other fields demand the deeper view provided by Macroevolution.
The role of extinction in evolution.
  • D. Raup
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1994
TLDR
The extinction of species is not normally considered an important element of neodarwinian theory, but the largest mass extinctions produce major restructuring of the biosphere wherein some successful groups are eliminated, allowing previously minor groups to expand and diversify.
The Structure of Evolutionary Theory
TLDR
Defining and Revising the Structure of Evolutionary Theory and the Integration of Constraint and Adaptation in Ontogeny and Phylogeny: Historical Constraints and the Evolution of Development.
The Evolutionary synthesis : perspectives on the unification of biology
TLDR
The Evolutionary Synthesis: Morgan and Natural Selection Revisited Revisited Garland E. Allen Hypotheses That Blur and Grow Hampton L. Carson Embryology Introduction William B. Provine The Evolution of Genetic Systems: Contributions of Cytology to Evolutionary Theory C.D. Darlington Morgan and the Theory of Natural Selection.
The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution, and Inheritance
TLDR
The history of biology describes the rise of science from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century and the changing intellectual milieu of biology.
Tempo and mode in evolution.
  • W. Fitch, F. Ayala
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1994
TLDR
In the introduction to his book, Simpson averred that an essential part of his study was an "attempted synthesis of paleontology and genetics," an effort that pervaded the whole book, but was particularly the subject of the first two chapters, which accounted for nearly half the book's pages.
The Ecology of Adaptive Radiation
TLDR
This volume is the ®rst of three volumes from a Festschrift marking the occasion of Richard C. Lewontin's 65th birthday and the approximate time of his retirement, and contains several chapters that were particularly noteworthy.
...
...