The minimum land area requiring conservation attention to safeguard biodiversity

@article{Allan2022TheML,
  title={The minimum land area requiring conservation attention to safeguard biodiversity},
  author={James R. Allan and Hugh P. Possingham and Scott C. Atkinson and Anthony Waldron and Moreno Di Marco and Stuart H. M. Butchart and Vanessa M. Adams and Wilm Daniel Kissling and Thomas Worsdell and Chris Sandbrook and Gwili Gibbon and Kundan Kumar and Piyush Mehta and Martine Maron and Brooke A. Williams and Kendall R. Jones and Brendan A. Wintle and April E. Reside and James E. M. Watson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2022},
  volume={376},
  pages={1094 - 1101}
}
Ambitious conservation efforts are needed to stop the global biodiversity crisis. In this study, we estimate the minimum land area to secure important biodiversity areas, ecologically intact areas, and optimal locations for representation of species ranges and ecoregions. We discover that at least 64 million square kilometers (44% of terrestrial area) would require conservation attention (ranging from protected areas to land-use policies) to meet this goal. More than 1.8 billion people live on… 

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