The minimally acceptable classification criterion for surgical skill: intent vectors and separability of raw motion data

Abstract

Minimally invasive surgery requires objective methods for skill evaluation and training. This work presents the minimally acceptable classification (MAC) criterion for computational surgery: Given an obvious novice and an obvious expert, a surgical skill evaluation classifier must yield 100% accuracy. We propose that a rigorous motion analysis algorithm must meet this minimal benchmark in order to justify its cost and use. We use this benchmark to investigate two concepts: First, how separable is raw, multidimensional dry laboratory laparoscopic motion data between obvious novices and obvious experts? We utilized information theoretic techniques to analytically address this. Second, we examined the use of intent vectors to classify surgical skill using three FLS tasks. We found that raw motion data alone are not sufficient to classify skill level; however, the intent vector approach is successful in classifying surgical skill level for certain tasks according to the MAC criterion. For a pattern cutting task, this approach yields 100% accuracy in leave-one-user-out cross-validation. Compared to prior art, the intent vector approach provides a generalized method to assess laparoscopic surgical skill using basic motion segments and passes the MAC criterion for some but not all FLS tasks.

DOI: 10.1007/s11548-017-1610-9

Cite this paper

@article{Dockter2017TheMA, title={The minimally acceptable classification criterion for surgical skill: intent vectors and separability of raw motion data}, author={Rodney Dockter and Thomas S. Lendvay and Robert M. Sweet and Timothy M. Kowalewski}, journal={International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery}, year={2017}, volume={12}, pages={1151-1159} }