The microbiome‐gut‐brain axis: from bowel to behavior

@article{Cryan2011TheMA,
  title={The microbiome‐gut‐brain axis: from bowel to behavior},
  author={J. Cryan and S. O'Mahony},
  journal={Neurogastroenterology \& Motility},
  year={2011},
  volume={23}
}
The ability of gut microbiota to communicate with the brain and thus modulate behavior is emerging as an exciting concept in health and disease. The enteric microbiota interacts with the host to form essential relationships that govern homeostasis. Despite the unique enteric bacterial fingerprint of each individual, there appears to be a certain balance that confers health benefits. It is, therefore, reasonable to note that a decrease in the desirable gastrointestinal bacteria will lead to… Expand

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