The mere urgency effect.

@article{Zhu2018TheMU,
  title={The mere urgency effect.},
  author={M. Zhu and Y. Yang and C. Hsee},
  journal={Journal of Consumer Research},
  year={2018},
  volume={45},
  pages={673-690}
}
In everyday life, people are often faced with choices between tasks of varying levels of urgency and importance. How do people choose? Normatively speaking, people may choose to perform urgent tasks with short completion windows, instead of important tasks with larger outcomes, because important tasks are more difficult and further away from goal completion, urgent tasks involve more immediate and certain payoffs, or people want to finish the urgent tasks first and then work on important tasks… Expand
24 Citations

Figures and Tables from this paper

Which task will we choose first? Precrastination and cognitive load in task ordering
  • 12
  • PDF
Implicit task switching in Parkinson’s disease is preserved when on medication
  • 2
  • PDF
‘Should I Buy, Hoard, or Hide?’- Consumers’ responses to perceived scarcity
  • 9
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 67 REFERENCES
Scarcity Frames Value
  • 180
Individual differences in reasoning: implications for the rationality debate?
  • 2,083
  • PDF
Some Consequences of Having Too Little
  • 733
  • PDF
How being busy can increase motivation and reduce task completion time.
  • 16
  • PDF
General Evaluability Theory
  • C. Hsee, Jiao Zhang
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perspectives on psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science
  • 2010
  • 225
  • PDF
The affect heuristic in judgments of risks and benefits
  • 2,150
  • PDF
Choices and judgments of incompletely described decision alternatives under time pressure
  • 104
  • Highly Influential
...
1
2
3
4
5
...