The mating system of a bee fly (Diptera: Bombyliidae). II. Factors affecting male territorial and mating success

@article{Dodson2005TheMS,
  title={The mating system of a bee fly (Diptera: Bombyliidae). II. Factors affecting male territorial and mating success},
  author={Gary N. Dodson and David K. Yeates},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={3},
  pages={619-636}
}
Males of an undescribed bombyliidfly (Comptosia sp.)occupy traditional territories on a Southeast Queensland hilltop, to which females come solely for the purpose of mating. Territorial fights between males involve aerial collisions during which modified spines on the wing margins produce scars on the bodies of opponents. Territory owners and mating males are not different in size or age from the remainder of the male population. Although residency is related to fighting success, the strength… 

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