The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J

@article{Maund2004TheMB,
  title={The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J},
  author={Justyn R. Maund and Steven J. Smartt and Rolf Peter Kudritzki and Philipp Podsiadlowski and Gerard Gilmore},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={427},
  pages={129-131}
}
The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II… 

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