The manifold use of pounding stone tools by wild capuchin monkeys of Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil

@article{Faltico2016TheMU,
  title={The manifold use of pounding stone tools by wild capuchin monkeys of Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil},
  author={Tiago Fal{\'o}tico and Eduardo B. Ottoni},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={2016},
  volume={153},
  pages={421-442}
}
The use of pounding stone tools (PSTs) is a customary behaviour in several wild populations of capuchin monkeys; most of these monkeys use PSTs primarily to open hard palm nuts. Here, we describe the use of PSTs in two not previously studied groups of capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus libidinosus ) in Serra da Capivara National Park (SCNP), northeastern Brazil, and compare them to other groups and populations. Capuchins from SCNP are one of the only known population that habitually use PSTs for… 

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