The low-affinity monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 is adapted to the export of lactate in highly glycolytic cells.

@article{Dimmer2000TheLM,
  title={The low-affinity monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 is adapted to the export of lactate in highly glycolytic cells.},
  author={K. Dimmer and B. Friedrich and F. Lang and J. Deitmer and S. Br{\"o}er},
  journal={The Biochemical journal},
  year={2000},
  volume={350 Pt 1},
  pages={
          219-27
        }
}
Transport of lactate and other monocarboxylates in mammalian cells is mediated by a family of transporters, designated monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The MCT4 member of this family has recently been identified as the major isoform of white muscle cells, mediating lactate efflux out of glycolytically active myocytes [Wilson, Jackson, Heddle, Price, Pilegaard, Juel, Bonen, Montgomery, Hutter and Halestrap (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 15920-15926]. To analyse the functional properties of this… Expand
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