The lost theorem

@article{Sallows1997TheLT,
  title={The lost theorem},
  author={Lee C. F. Sallows},
  journal={The Mathematical Intelligencer},
  year={1997},
  volume={19},
  pages={51-54}
}
A magic square, as all the world knows, is a square array of numbers whose sum in any row, column, or main diagonal is the same. So-called "normal" squares are ones in which the numbers used are 1,2,3, and so on, but other numbers may be used. Squares using repeated entries are deemed trivial. We say that a square of size N × N is of order N. Clearly, magic squares of order1 lack glamour, while a moment's thought shows that a square of order 2 cannot be realized using distinct entries. The… Expand
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