The longest voyage: Tectonic, magmatic, and paleoclimatic evolution of the Indian plate during its northward flight from Gondwana to Asia

@article{Chatterjee2013TheLV,
  title={The longest voyage: Tectonic, magmatic, and paleoclimatic evolution of the Indian plate during its northward flight from Gondwana to Asia},
  author={Sankar Chatterjee and A. Goswami and Christopher R. Scotese},
  journal={Gondwana Research},
  year={2013},
  volume={23},
  pages={238-267}
}
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